Department of Anesthesiology

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The effects of cocaine on dietary self-selection in female rats.

TitleThe effects of cocaine on dietary self-selection in female rats.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1993
AuthorsBane AJ, McCoy JG, Stump BS, Avery DD
JournalPhysiol Behav
Volume54
Issue3
Pagination509-13
Date Published1993 Sep
ISSN0031-9384
KeywordsAnimals, Body Weight, Cocaine, Dietary Carbohydrates, Dietary Fats, Dietary Proteins, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Energy Intake, Female, Food Preferences, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Abstract

Cocaine was administered via an oral route to 18-h food deprived female rats for 14 consecutive days. Following administration of the drug or vehicle control each animal was presented with separate isocaloric rations of protein, fat, and carbohydrate in a dietary self-selection situation. Amounts consumed of each component were measured at 30 min, 60 min, 2 h, and 6 h following the drug treatment. The intake of all three macronutrients was suppressed by cocaine for 1 h. Between 2 and 6 h after administration, there was a compensatory increase in fat and carbohydrate, but not protein consumption. The results are discussed in terms of protein deficiency caused by cocaine in pregnant and/or lactating females being a causal factor in the deleterious effects on offspring.

Alternate JournalPhysiol. Behav.
PubMed ID8415945