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Department of Anesthesiology

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Potential clinical uses of short-acting nondepolarizing neuromuscular-blocking agents as predicted from animal experiments.

TitlePotential clinical uses of short-acting nondepolarizing neuromuscular-blocking agents as predicted from animal experiments.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1975
AuthorsSavarese JJ, Antonio RP, Ginsburg S
JournalAnesth Analg
Volume54
Issue5
Pagination669-78
Date Published1975 Sep-Oct
ISSN0003-2999
KeywordsAnimals, Cats, Dogs, Drug Interactions, Haplorhini, Neuromuscular Nondepolarizing Agents, Pain, Potassium, Quaternary Ammonium Compounds, Succinylcholine, Time Factors, Tubocurarine
Abstract

It is readily evident that a short-acting nondepolarizing agent suitable for clinical use would be of value in anesthesiology. The most commonly used short-acting relaxant, succinylcholine, is a depolarizing drug, with all the side effects inherent in such agents. The authors have investigated the actions of several short-acting nondepolarizing ester neuromuscular-blocking drug in comparison with succinylcholine, and theri interactions with d-tubocurarine, and inhibitors of true and plasma cholinesterase. Two experimental agents, HH-85 and JJ-142, are examples. Tests in animals suggest areas of extrapolation to human use.

Alternate JournalAnesth. Analg.
PubMed ID126651