Department of Anesthesiology

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Feeding neural networks in the mollusc Aplysia.

TitleFeeding neural networks in the mollusc Aplysia.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsCropper EC, Evans CG, Hurwitz I, Jing J, Proekt A, Romero A, Rosen SC
JournalNeurosignals
Volume13
Issue1-2
Pagination70-86
Date Published2004 Jan-Apr
ISSN1424-862X
KeywordsAction Potentials, Animals, Aplysia, Behavior, Animal, Digestive System Physiological Phenomena, Feedback, Feeding Behavior, Ganglia, Invertebrate, Motor Activity, Nerve Net, Neural Inhibition, Neural Networks (Computer), Neurons
Abstract

Aplysia feeding is striking in that it is executed with a great deal of plasticity. At least in part, this flexibility is a result of the organization of the feeding neural network. To illustrate this, we primarily discuss motor programs triggered via stimulation of the command-like cerebral-buccal interneuron 2 (CBI-2). CBI-2 is interesting in that it can generate motor programs that serve opposing functions, i.e., programs can be ingestive or egestive. When programs are egestive, radula-closing motor neurons are activated during the protraction phase of the motor program. When programs are ingestive, radula-closing motor neurons are activated during retraction. When motor programs change in nature, activity in the radula-closing circuitry is altered. Thus, CBI-2 stimulation stereotypically activates the protraction and retraction circuitry, with protraction being generated first, and retraction immediately thereafter. In contrast, radula-closing motor neurons can be activated during either protraction or retraction. Which will occur is determined by whether other cerebral and buccal neurons are recruited, e.g. radula-closing motor neurons tend to be activated during retraction if a second CBI, CBI-3, is recruited. Fundamentally different motor programs are, therefore, generated because CBI-2 activates some interneurons in a stereotypic manner and other interneurons in a variable manner.

DOI10.1159/000076159
Alternate JournalNeurosignals
PubMed ID15004426
Grant ListK02 MH01267 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
MH35564 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
MH51393 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
RR-10294 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States