Department of Anesthesiology

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Assessing sleepiness in the rat: a multiple sleep latencies test compared to polysomnographic measures of sleepiness.

TitleAssessing sleepiness in the rat: a multiple sleep latencies test compared to polysomnographic measures of sleepiness.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsMcKenna JT, Cordeira JW, Christie MA, Tartar JL, McCoy JG, Lee E, McCarley RW, Strecker RE
JournalJ Sleep Res
Volume17
Issue4
Pagination365-75
Date Published2008 Dec
ISSN1365-2869
KeywordsAnimals, Disease Models, Animal, Disorders of Excessive Somnolence, Electroencephalography, Electromyography, Eye Movements, Humans, Male, Polysomnography, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Sleep Stages, Wakefulness
Abstract

Sleepiness following 6 h of sleep deprivation (SD) was evaluated with a rat multiple sleep latencies test (rMSLT), and the findings were compared to conventional polysomnographic measures of sleepiness. The 6 h of SD was produced by automated activity wheels, and was terminated at either the end of the light period or at the beginning of the dark period. The rMSLT consisted of 5 min wakefulness induced by sensory stimulation followed by 25 min of freedom to sleep. This procedure was repeated every 30 min for 3 h and was designed to minimize the amount of sleep lost due to the testing procedure. In separate rats, 6 h SD was followed by undisturbed recovery, allowing evaluation of conventional polysomnographic measures of sleepiness. Sleep onset latencies were reduced following SD, with recovery in the light (baseline = 8 min, 3 s versus post-SD = 1 min, 17 s) and dark period (baseline = 14 min, 17 s versus 7 min, 7 s). Sleep onset latencies were not altered by varying the duration criterion for the first sleep bout (i.e., sleep bout length criteria of 10, 20, 30, or 60 s were compared). Polysomnographic variables (non-rapid eye movement sleep episode duration, delta power, and number of awakenings) also provided reliable indirect measures of sleepiness, regardless of whether the recovery sleep occurred in the light or dark period. Evaluation of effect size indicated that the rMSLT was a strong measure of sleepiness, and was influenced by homeostatic, circadian, and illumination factors. The rMSLT provided a simple, objective, robust and direct measure of sleepiness that was as effective as conventional polysomnographic measures of sleepiness.

DOI10.1111/j.1365-2869.2008.00686.x
Alternate JournalJ Sleep Res
PubMed ID18823428
PubMed Central IDPMC2673573
Grant ListF32 MH070156-01A1 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
HL060292 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HL07901 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MH039683 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
MH070156 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
P50 HL060292-10 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R37 MH039683-23 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007901-07 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States