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Department of Anesthesiology

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Sickle Cell Disease is Associated with Increased Morbidity, Resource Utilization, and Readmissions after Common Abdominal Surgeries: A Multistate Analysis, 2007-2014.

TitleSickle Cell Disease is Associated with Increased Morbidity, Resource Utilization, and Readmissions after Common Abdominal Surgeries: A Multistate Analysis, 2007-2014.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsBrumm J, White RS, Arroyo NS, Gaber-Baylis LK, Gupta S, Turnbull ZA, Mehta N
JournalJ Natl Med Assoc
Date Published2020 Feb 20
ISSN1943-4693
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most commonly inherited hemoglobinopathy in the United States, increases the likelihood of postoperative complications, resulting in higher costs and readmissions. We used a retrospective cohort study to explore SCD's influence on postoperative complications and readmissions after cholecystectomy, appendectomy, and hysterectomy.

METHODS: We used an administrative database's 2007-2014 data from California, Florida, New York, Maryland, and Kentucky.

RESULTS: 1,934,562 patients aged ≥18 years were included. Compared to non-SCD patients, SCD patients experienced worse outcomes: increased odds of blood transfusion and major and minor complications, higher adjusted odds of 30- and 90-day readmissions, longer length of stay, and higher total hospital charges.

CONCLUSION: Sickle cell disease patients are at high risk for poor outcomes based on their demographic characteristics. Therefore, perioperative physicians including hematologists, anesthesiologists, and surgeons need to take this knowledge into consideration for management and counselling of SCD patients on the risks of surgery and recovery.

DOI10.1016/j.jnma.2020.01.001
Alternate JournalJ Natl Med Assoc
PubMed ID32089275