We are seeing patients in-person and through Video Visits. Learn more about how we’re keeping you safe and please review our updated visitor policy. Please also consider supporting Weill Cornell Medicine’s efforts to support our front-line workers.
Department of Anesthesiology

You are here

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Maternal Outcomes and the Disadvantage of Peripartum Black Women: A Multistate Analysis, 2007-2014.

TitleRacial and Ethnic Disparities in Maternal Outcomes and the Disadvantage of Peripartum Black Women: A Multistate Analysis, 2007-2014.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsTangel V, White RS, Nachamie AS, Pick JS
JournalAm J Perinatol
Date Published2018 Nov 05
ISSN1098-8785
Abstract

OBJECTIVE:  Racial and ethnic disparities in obstetric care and delivery outcomes have shown that black women experience high rates of pregnancy-related mortality and morbidity, along with high rates of cesarean delivery, compared with other racial and ethnic groups. We aimed to quantify these disparities and test the effects of race/ethnicity in stratified statistical models by insurance payer and socioeconomic status, adjusting for comorbidities specific to an obstetric population.

STUDY DESIGN:  We analyzed maternal outcomes in a sample of 6,872,588 delivery records from California, Florida, Kentucky, Maryland, and New York from 2007 to 2014 from the State Inpatient Databases, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. We compared present-on-admission characteristics of parturients by race/ethnicity, and estimated logistic regression and generalized linear models to assess outcomes of in-hospital mortality, cesarean delivery, and length of stay.

RESULTS:  Compared with white women, black women were more likely to die in-hospital (odds ratio [OR]: 1.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.47-2.45) and have a longer average length of stay (incidence rate ratio: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.09-1.10). Black women also were more likely to have a cesarean delivery (OR: 1.12, 95% CI 1.12-1.13) than white women. These results largely held in stratified analyses.

CONCLUSION:  In most insurance payers and socioeconomic strata, race/ethnicity alone is a factor that predicts parturient outcomes.

DOI10.1055/s-0038-1675207
Alternate JournalAm J Perinatol
PubMed ID30396228